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Tag Archives: Ayesha Casely-Hayford

Una Marson

13 December
London Calling by Una Marson play excerpt directed by Ayesha Casely-Hayford

Una Marson: Feminist, activist. Thinker, nationalist. Broadcaster, producer, editor. Writer in Jamaica and England, across the 20s to the 60s of the 20th century she wrote columns, features, reports, poems, manifestos, radio programmes – plays. She edited and published journals, produced culture, and she was the first black radio producer to be employed by the BBC. Via […]

Biography

21 April
Refi and Kes Casely-Hayford

Biography Awura-Afua Ayesha Casely-Hayford was born in Battersea, London. She has a younger brother, Paa-Kwesi Bertrand Casely-Hayford. Both their first names are traditional names from the Fante tribe in Ghana. They are known amongst their friends and close family as Refi and Kes.  Their parents were born in Accra, Ghana. They came to London  in […]

After Earnest

12 April
Two actresses called Ayesha Casely-Hayford and Kudzanayi Chiwawa perform The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

Our Two Gents production of The Importance of Being Earnest was a 12-week project. And now it’s all done. These are my reflections, After Earnest. For a 12-week period of time, we took Oscar Wilde’s seminal play, The Importance Of Being Earnest, and transformed this classical text into our own. We welcomed it into our lives, […]

Earnest

21 October
Two women of colour sit at a table with strong expressions on their faces. They are wearing matching white t-shirts.

The Importance Of Being Earnest The Importance of Being Earnest, is a play written by Oscar Wilde. We are performing it as two women of colour, that is myself and actress Kudzanayi Chiwawa. Between us, we are doing ALL of the parts. This means multi-roles, multi-accents and taking the confusion of this play to a […]

My Fro & Me: Hair Stories from Women of Colour

02 December
Afro Archives A Performer's World By Ayesha Casely-Hayford

Hair Stories On 28th November 2017 “My Fro & Me”  –  Hair Stories from Women of Colour  – was at The National Theatre, London, UK. We talked hair, culture, identity, Eurocentric ideals of beauty on our stage and screens, and discrimination. Endlessly Afro. “The prime responsibility of the theatre is to show a culture its […]

Stage Day

12 July
Stage

What a day. I’ve been part of a round-table discussion on casting led by John Byrne (Careers Advisor at The Stage: the Entertainment Industry’s leading newspaper). Along with four other actors of varying experience we shared thoughts and knowledge about what really happens on the ground in trying to make a living in the acting […]